Poly Board Repair

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windlord
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Joined: 02/07/2002 - 10:05
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Poly Board Repair

Howdy,

Does anyone have any suggestions on the best method for repairing a poly-board?  My O'Brien Elite developed a 3" split at the nose on Monday Cray 2 (after leaving the water thankfully).  The methods I found on rec.windsurfing were:

1) Goop adhesive
2) Hot glue sticks
3) Epoxy/glass
4) "P-tex" for snow skis
5) Melting with a soldering iron

Bill

Bill Herderich

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webguy's picture
webguy
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Joined: 12/31/2000 - 22:01
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Re: Poly Board Repair

euthanasia?

(man, I'm being hard on the folks at Galts these days)

wf

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webguy's picture
webguy
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Joined: 12/31/2000 - 22:01
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Re: Poly Board Repair

I think if you look on the links page you will find links to a board building page (anthwind something) that has some poly repair info.

Then again, it might be a good time to visit Gene's Consignment shop.

Randy

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FoilDodo
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Joined: 03/19/2008 - 23:50
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Re: Poly Board Repair

Bill, I think the best method is to carefully roughen the edges of the crack with 80 grit sandpaper, then clean the area with acetone. Use Marinetex (careful to use equal portions of A & Dirol to fill the crack, then sand smooth when cured. (Be sure the board, air and Marinetex are all above 50 degrees). Finally get a few friends to help throw the whole thing in a dumpster. I hope this helps.

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webguy
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Joined: 12/31/2000 - 22:01
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Re: Poly Board Repair

Gentlemen,

I sense that nobody likes my board ???.  So, if I do trash it, what should I get?  

Just to refresh your memory, I’m 190 lb. early intermediate (using the harness but not in straps yet). I’m able to tack, pivot jibe and can waterstart reasonable well.  I want to be able to sail Atlanta area lakes with occasional trips around the Southeast (Hatteras, San Blas, Jax, etc), in winds from 5/10 to 35(?) mph.

Cheers,

Bill

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webguy
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Re: Poly Board Repair

Actually, it's not that we don't like your board, but it does sound like it's keep you from getting to the next level.  Planing in or out of the straps in the Elite isn't going to make that big of a difference.  Get yourself a more modern shortboard from anywhere from 130-170 liters or a Mistral One Design, Equipe II, Superlight II or a good transitional like the Phoenix or Bic 328 and you will be amply rewarded for sticking those toes into the straps.  If you can waterstart, there is no reason not to be in the straps.  Straps mean control and safety.  About the only time I get launched (short of catching a rail at scary fast speeds) is when I'm out of the straps after the sail flip in a jibe.  

1) You want a board that does it all: Get a good longboard, transitional or wide-style shortboard (eg Go or Techno 283)
2) You want to rip on a shortboard: anything 135 liters or up should do you.  The newer wide boards will have more range and be easier to sail but something like a Veloce 298, Explosion 298, Bic 310 or Xantos 310 is easier to find used and will have decent range.

The boards in the first group will weigh from 10-15 pounds less and the good longboards will rocket in lightwind like you won't believe (there is a big difference between your O'Brien's centerboard and one on an Equipe).  The second group will be 25 or more lbs less.  Easier to deal with, more lively and more rewarding.

Go ahead and patch up the O'Brien but remember that sometimes accidents happen for a reason.  JUst make sure the patch is water-tight (like that board needs to gain any more weight :o )

wf

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ccampbe11
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Joined: 02/07/2002 - 12:05
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Re: Poly Board Repair

I agree with William on this one.  If you can waterstart, its more than time to ditch the O'Brien.  It will slow, if not stop, any progress you want to make with strap/harness usage, jibes and other intermediate skills.  Plan on someday having at least a two board quiver -- no one board will be fun in the 5-35 mph wind range.  One of these boards should be something like a high performance longboard, or a super wide shortboard (like a Starboard Go).  The other, a 100-115L shortboard. If you get real serious about high wind sailing, you then may want to add another board in 85L range.

Chuck Hardin has some tips on buying a larger beginner type board. Don't let the beginner classification fool you though, since these newer wider 'beginner' board make excellent light-medium high performance cruisers as well (capable of good speed, carving jibes, etc...) The link is http://www.whitecapwindsurfing.com/rental/beginner%27sgear.html

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webguy's picture
webguy
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Re: Poly Board Repair

Bill - I definitely agree that you should have two boards.  I think that one should be one with a center board and big enough to be relatively easy for light wind cruising or freestyling - here the Obrien might continue to fit the bill, so to speak, or you might opt for something else that big or bigger, but lighter and livelier.  Many options available used for small change.  Do get a shortboard, and if you want to make the advance rapidly as possible and make the most of our often less than ideal conditions, get a relatively new wide type board.  How wide, how floaty?  That is the tough question.  Try some newer boards if you can.  Try a starboard Go for instance, if you haven't yet.  You might not want to go that wide, or you may want to go wider.  In any case, don't buy a board that you can't uphaul with relative ease, because there will be times when you really need to.  Wind Monday?

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