Blogs

webguy's picture

Motivation

I found this video the other night. What a wonderful bit of motivation for all of us. Now that it's getting warmer, I hope we all take the opportunity to try new things whether its just getting comfortable on a board or trying an advanced move. Have fun!

bpw's picture

Outer Banks Spring 2018

Outer Banks Spring 2018

Again this Spring we’ve rented a 5-bedroom house at the same great waterfront location. We have plenty of space because 4 of our regular guests have either moved out of area, or can’t come due to conditions of employment.

Reservations:
The price per week is - $400 single and $450 per couple. Call either Barrett or Peggy with questions. To reserve please send your check to Barrett & Peggy Walker. Our contact and address information is listed at the bottom of the flyer.

Gear Rentals:
Most guests bring their own gear, but you can conveniently rent from OceanAir (252) 995-5000). Brian, the shop owner, lives next door to our house. Ocean Air is a full service shop for windsurfing, kiting, and paddle boarding. In May Kitty Hawk Watersports opens one mile from our house. The second shop rents and gives beginner windsurfing and paddle board lessons. There are many rental locations for surfing, bicycles, kayaks, and other gear. Want to try surfing, but don’t have your own board? Rent from Cavalier Surf Shop, about a mile from the house. Kitty Hawk Kites gives hang gliding lessons nearby on the sand dunes were the Wright Brothers first flew.

Foiling:
Last Fall three guests successfully foiled from the house. The water is chest-deep if you walk your gear out and avoid sailing near the islands.

Information flyer attached below:

Barrett

webguy's picture

Why we haven't written

For anyone who may be wondering why the production of articles has been lacking the last few months, we've been very busy with stuff behind the scenes to improve the web site usability and layout; and, a fair amount of the added content has been in the wiki.

  • A lot of the more visible changes have been to the site's layout. There's been some massaging, tweaking and modernizing. We did a lot to make mobile browsing easier and quicker. Some of the changes are cosmetic, like trying a little different hairstyle. Others were to improve navigation and make more features visible such as the "My Account" tab on the top menu.
  • We've done a lot of work underneath to improve page load times. There's a bit of technical work involved in some cases (database caching and other dry subjects with the effectiveness of Ambien) and others of streamlining the delivery of the various components by reducing the size and number that make up a web page.
  • We've done a huge rewrite and update of the entire Maps and Places to Sail on the wiki. We still have more work to do on the maps but we have information and directions for places over the entire Southeast. We have almost all of the 65 different pages updated with an individual map as well as regional maps for states and the entire Southeast.
  • We've already announced these but a reminder that you can subscribe to forums (either via that forum main page or notifications on your account page, write your own blog posts, make a photo album . If you have any questions, pop us an email:

But here's the best news - this website is about connecting the community and sharing the fun of being on (and above) the water. Everytime you visit and, better, participate, it improves the site. Keep logging on, reading and posting!
If there is more stuff you'd like to see here or have constructive criticism (which I may or may not listen to), again, drop us a line.

webguy's picture

Journal Entry: April 8

When I began seriously windsurfing, I began to keep a journal, notes in a little spiral bound notebook. It was quite helpful. I logged my sessions and noted sail trim settings - downhaul, outhaul, etc.
I ran across it the other day when cleaning out the garage and ran across this entry:


That was twenty three years ago. I'd had a good day windsurfing and then got in the car and turned on the radio.


I would have written that differently had I known that it would be posted for public consumption. Nirvana was a big deal as we transitioned from the synth New Wave and hair metal of the 80s to the grunge of the 90s and Kurt Cobain was, arguably, its biggest voice.

As is typical for me, the self-discipline petered out after a few more entries. That's probably for the best as a few of the other entries were horribly arrogant for a newbie. I'm not very good now, two decades later, so to read my self-assessment then is a bit cringey. Ah, the folly of youth.


Oh, and Amy is one my wife's good friends from med school. Just in case anybody was thinking, "What?"

Pages